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Little Silver, Oceanport Residents Less Charitable Than Neighbors, Study Shows

Despite giving $11.4 million in 2008, both municipalities fell short of county, state and national averages

Little Silver and Oceanport residents gave $11.4 million to charity in 2008 but both municipalities gave less on average as a proportion of income when compared to greater Monmouth County, New Jersey and the entire United States, a recent analysis shows.

Little Silver residents gave an average of 3.1 percent of their discretionary income to charity in 2008, the most recent year studied by the Chronicle of Philanthropy, a service that covers the nonprofit industry. Oceanport residents were less generous, giving 2.1 percent of their discretionary income to charity in 2008.

Those averages fall short when compared with the county (4.2 percent), state (3.7 percent) and national (4.7 percent) averages. 

However, both municipalities far exceed the whole dollar amounts given to charity when compared to the county, state and nation.

In 2008, Little Silver residents gave a total of $7.3 million with a median contribution of $3,519. Oceanport residents donated $4.1 million with a median contribution of $3,938.

In comparison, Monmouth residents averaged a $2,253 contribution, the state averaged $2,181 and the overall national average was $2,564.

The proportion of money given to charity in both municipalities was highest among households with the lowest incomes and fell as household incomes climbed. 

Little Silver households earning from $50,000 to $99,999 gave an average of 6.8 percent of their discretionary income to charity; households earning from $100,000 to $199,999 gave 3.7 percent; and those making $200,000 and up donated 2.2 percent.

Oceanport households earning from $50,000 to $99,999 gave an average of 5.9 percent of their discretionary income to charity; households earning from $100,000 to $199,999 gave 3.2 percent; and those making $200,000 and up donated 1.7 percent.

However, the dollar amounts given were highest among the wealthiest households and fell with discretionary incomes. 

Little Silver households earning $200,000 and up gave an average of $7,342; households earning from $100,000 to $199,999 gave $2,950; and households making from $50,000 to $99,999 gave $1,653.

Oceanport households earning $200,000 and up gave an average of $5,710; households earning from $100,000 to $199,999 gave $2,656; and households earning from $50,000 to $99,999 gave $1,674.

Dentss Dunnagun August 23, 2012 at 09:06 AM
the simple answer here is Property taxes .....since both towns receive very little if any state aid ..which is state income tax returned towns that they send to Trenton .Little Silver received zero school aid back but sent in over 10 million in income taxes that all went to 36 Abbott districts .Shouldn't that be counted as charity ?
Dan August 23, 2012 at 11:05 AM
Headline is slanted and misleading. In fact aforementioned residents gave much more in total dollars but only less as a percent of income. The headline could have been 'residents more charitable', etc. the rate doesn't matter, the dollars do
John Anderson August 23, 2012 at 12:46 PM
Well said Dentss!
Kathleen Devine August 23, 2012 at 01:54 PM
I agree Dan you that as far as generosity, both towns come through plenty and they are devoted to their schools. I don't think the numbers truly could reflect the hours upon hours that people donate to the many things they participate in. If it was just a matter of money it would be an easy calculation. The communities have dedicated volunteers to make recreation and schools work well.
Kathleen Devine August 23, 2012 at 01:57 PM
I don't know if the figures are including the $40,000 raised for the 8th grade events. As far as I know those funds are given to the school and spent by the school. We do not get receipts or any records. So if the source was simple tax returns I believe that the numbers are not representative of the true picture. I believe the Chronicle of Philanthropy has it wrong and I do not like hearing about 2008 the year of the economic catastrophe when it is 2012. I do not consider this reflective of the communities at all.
service August 23, 2012 at 02:31 PM
well if we're lucky maybe after reading this people will stop asking us for money!
carolynn diakon August 23, 2012 at 04:11 PM
I am surrounded by generous and charitable neighbors in all the local towns. I know how much many of them do day in and day out to help others. There is no study or report that can track the generous spirit and caring attitudes of the area

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